The Intercultural Throughline Title

Category: Treaty or Borders

An image of the base of architectural columns that might be in front of a courthouse. There is also the following text: "McGirt v. Oklahoma Supreme Court Decision Affirms Tribal Sovereignty, Upholds Treaty Rights." In the bottom corner of the image is the logo for the Arizona State University American Indian Policy Institute.

McGirt v. Oklahoma overturned

In 2020 the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction of child rapist Jimcy McGirt on the grounds that the Creek Nation’s reservation was never disestablished for criminal jurisdiction. State courts no longer have the authority to prosecute crimes committed by or against Oklahomans who are also tribal members. Hundreds of criminal cases are now being dismissed because the state does not have the ability to try and convict criminals on historic tribal lands.

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An image of Kim Teehee speaking in front of a microphone.

Chief Hoskin announces the appointment of a Cherokee Nation delegate to Congress

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. announced that the tribe is taking a historic initial step to enact the Cherokee Nation’s treaty right to send a delegate to the U.S. Congress. The Cherokee Nation delegate is referenced in both the Treaty of Hopewell from 1785 and the Treaty of New Echota from 1835 between the Cherokee Nation and the federal government. The Treaty of 1866 also reaffirms all previous treaties between the Cherokee Nation and the United States. For nearly two centuries, Congress has failed to honor this promise. Yet the obligation to seat a Cherokee Nation delegate remains..Read More

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The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, 1848

A treaty ending the Mexican-American war, defining the present day US-Mexico border by losing the land to the US that included all or parts of modern day Utah, California, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, and Texas.

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