Full Timeline

1000
Artwork showing a person with long dark hair sitting on the shell of a giant turtle in a large body of water. The person is surrounded by different kinds of birds and a few other animals, and they are holding some plants up to the sky.

Haudenosaunee Creation Story

Kanyen’kehaka Creation Story from Kay Olan’s Version retold by Sha’tekayenton Andrew Bryant Credible Mohawk Entertainment. Haudenosaunee Creation Story

1000
Origin Story of the Inka

Origin Story of the Inka

The chronicler Inka Garcilaso de la Vega recorded the origin story of the Inka and the founding of Cusco, the capital of their great empire, in his “Royal Commentaries of Peru,” published in 1609. According to the Inka origin story, Inti, the sun, sent two of his children—Manco Capac and Mama SmithsonianNMAI Origin Story of the Inka

1619
Engraving showing the arrival of a ship and enslaved Africans to the British colony of Virginia.

A Portuguese ship, the São João Bautista brought captive Africans from Angola to the American colonies.

Sometime in 1619 enslaved Africans arrive near Point Comfort, a coastal port in the British colony of Virginia from the Portuguese colony port city of Luanda, the present day capital of Angola. Over 20 captives were unloaded from the hull of the São João Bautista. America had not become herself, yet lit the spark for the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and further set the stage for slavery, oppression and persecution across her history.

1680
Image is of a drawing with a person standing and their face turned upwards. In one hand, they are holding a basket with plants standing straight up out of it.

Pueblo Revolt

The first and largest Indigenous uprising in so called North America. “The Pueblo people orchestrated the unthinkable: a pan-Indian uprising successfully expelling the Spanish occupiers from the entire Rio Grande region leading to an indigenous cultural and social renaissance.” Learn more from A Brief History of The Pueblo Revolt and the animation Frontera! Revolt and Rebellion on the Rio Grande

1804
Absalom Jones

Absalom Jones

Absalom Jones life defined what service to others looked like. While still enslaved at 16, Absalom worked during the day and went to school at night. Eventually, he earned enough money to “purchase” his wife’s freedom, fourteen years before purchasing his own. He was elected as the first ever African American priest of the Episcopal Church in October of 1804. Before he passed away, he petitioned the State of Pennsylvania and the US Congress to abolish enslavement, decades before its time.

1807
Omar ibn Said

Omar ibn Said

Omar ibn Said was born around 1770 in an African region then called Futa Toro, near the Senegal River, which now forms Senegal’s northern border with Mauritania. After receiving 25 years of schooling in Africa, he was enslaved and transported to Charleston, South Carolina. Not long after his arrival and sale to a local planter, Said escaped and made his way to Fayetteville, North Carolina, where he was imprisoned after entering a Christian church to pray. After garnering attention for writing on the walls of his prison cell in Arabic, Said became the legal property of General James Owen of..Read More

1811
1811 Slave Revolt Louisiana German Coast – Jan 8-10

1811 Slave Revolt Louisiana German Coast – Jan 8-10

The 1811 German Coast uprising was a revolt of black slaves in parts of the Territory of Orleans on January 8–10, 1811. The uprising occurred on the east bank of the Mississippi River. Learn more: https://www.zinnedproject.org/news/tdih/louisianas-slave-revolt/

1830
Indian Removal Act, 1830

Indian Removal Act, 1830

Indian Removal Act — 1830 Signed into law in 1830 by President Andrew Jackson, the Indian Removal Act provided for the general resettlement of Native Americans from east of the Mississippi River to lands west (Indian Territory). Although the removal was supposed to be voluntary, removal became mandatory whenever the government thought necessary. Thousands of Indian people including nearly the entire Indian population that had existed in the southeastern United States were moved west. The first removal treaty to follow the passage of the Indian Removal Act was with the Choctaw Nation (1830). In 1838 the Cherokee Nation was removed..Read More

1848
The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, 1848

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, 1848

A treaty ending the Mexican-American war, defining the present day US-Mexico border by losing the land to the US that included all or parts of modern day Utah, California, Nevada, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Wyoming, and Texas.

1887
Dawes Act Image

The Dawes Act of 1887

The Dawes Act of 1887 (also known as the General Allotment Act or the Dawes Severalty Act of 1887),[1][2] authorized the President of the United States to survey Native American tribal land and divide it into allotments for individual Native Americans. Those who accepted allotments and lived separately from the tribe would be granted United States citizenship. The Dawes Act was amended in 1891, in 1898 by the Curtis Act, and again in 1906 by the Burke Act.

1893
Old black and white photograph of Queen Liliʻuokalani. It is an official photograph and she is in formal dress.

Illegal Overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom

In the nineteenth century, the Hawaiian Kingdom existed as an independent country recognized as such by the United States of America, the United Kingdom, and various other countries, including by exchanges of diplomatic or consular representatives and the conclusion of treaties. As an independent county, the Hawaiian Kingdom entered into extensive treaty relations with a variety of States establishing diplomatic relations and trade agreements. By 1893, the Hawaiian Kingdom maintained over ninety Legations and Consulates throughout the world. In the United States of America, the Hawaiian Kingdom manned a diplomatic post called a legation in Washington, D.C., which served in..Read More

1913
Moorish Science Temple of America and Nobel Drew Ali

Moorish Science Temple of America and Nobel Drew Ali

Moorish Science Temple of America, U.S. religious movement founded in Newark, N.J., in 1913 by Timothy Drew (1886–1929), known to followers as Noble Drew Ali and also as the Prophet. Drew Ali taught that all blacks were of Moorish origins but had their Muslim identity taken away from them through slavery and racial segregation. He advocated that they should “return” to the Islam of their Moorish forefathers, redeeming themselves from racial oppression by reclaiming their historical spiritual heritage. He also encouraged use of the term “Moor” rather than “black” in self-identification. Many of the group’s formal practices were derived from..Read More

1929
The Mexican Repatriation, 1929-36

The Mexican Repatriation, 1929-36

The Mexican Repatriation was a mass deportation of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans from the United States between 1929 and 1936. Estimates of how many were repatriated range from 400,000 to 2,000,000. An estimated sixty percent of those deported were birthright citizens of the United States. Because the forced movement was based on race, and ignored citizenship, the process meets modern legal definitions of ethnic cleansing. Widely blamed for exacerbating the overall economic downturn of the Great Depression, Mexicans were further targeted because of “the proximity of the Mexican border, the physical distinctiveness of mestizos, and easily identifiable barrios.” While supported by..Read More

1934
The Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934

The Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934

The Indian Reorganization Act of June 18, 1934, or the Wheeler-Howard Act, was U.S. federal legislation that dealt with the status of Native Americans (known in law as American Indians or Indians). It was the centerpiece of what has been often called the “Indian New Deal”. The major goal was to reverse the traditional goal of assimilation of Indians into American society and to strengthen, encourage and perpetuate the tribes and their historic traditions and culture.

1937
This is a presentation slide with the title "Puerto Rico: La Operacion." There is a black and white image of a woman smiling while looking at a young child that she is holding. There is also the following text: "Young women were key to labor force — Problem was pregnancy. Result: massive sterilization program. Women coerced into sterilization without being told it was irreversible. By 1968, 1/3 of women childbearing age were sterilized. Emigration and sterilization resulted in population drop with no increase in standard of living."

Sterilization of Puerto Rican Women

In 1937, Puerto Rico enacted Law 116, the last eugenics sterilization law passed under United States territorial jurisdiction. Soon after, a program endorsed by the U.S. government began sending health department officials to rural parts of the island advocating for sterilization. The Puerto Rican government fully supported this program, as it attributed overpopulation to the island’s high levels of poverty and unemployment. With the growth of American corporations on Puerto Rican soil and factory work, they also wanted to integrate women into the workforce more fully and child bearing was seen as an obstacle to that. In fact, sterilization efforts were..Read More

1943

The Zoot Suit Riots, Los Angeles, June 3-8, 1943

The Zoot Suit Riots were a series of conflicts on June 3–8, 1943 in Los Angeles, California, United States, which pitted American servicemen stationed in Southern California against Mexican-American youths and other minorities who were residents of the city. It was one of the dozen wartime industrial cities that suffered racial-related riots in the summer of 1943, along with Mobile, Alabama; Beaumont, Texas; Detroit, Michigan; and New York City. American servicemen and white civilians attacked and stripped children, teens, and youths who wore zoot suits, ostensibly because they considered the outfits to be unpatriotic during World War II, as they..Read More

1954
Operation Wetback, Summer 1954

Operation Wetback, Summer 1954

Operation Wetback was an immigration law enforcement initiative created by Joseph Swing, the Director of the United States Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), in cooperation with the Mexican government. The program was implemented in May 1954 by U.S. Attorney General Herbert Brownell and utilized special tactics to deal with illegal border crossings into the United States by Mexican nationals. The program became a contentious issue in Mexico–United States relations, even though it originated from a request by the Mexican government to stop the illegal entry of Mexican laborers into the United States. Legal entry of Mexican workers for employment was..Read More

1956
The Indian Relocation Act of 1956

The Indian Relocation Act of 1956

The Indian Relocation Act of 1956 (also known as Public Law 959 or the Adult Vocational Training Program) was a United States law intended to encourage Native Americans in the United States to leave Indian reservations, acquire vocational skills, and assimilate into the general population. Part of the Indian termination policy of that era, which terminated the tribal status of numerous groups, it played a significant role in increasing the population of urban Indians in succeeding decades.

1960
The Chicano Art Movement, 1960’s – present

The Chicano Art Movement, 1960’s – present

The Chicano Art Movement represents attempts by Mexican-American artists to establish a unique artistic identity in the United States. Much of the art and the artists creating Chicano Art were heavily influenced by Chicano Movement (El Movimiento) which began in the 1960s. Chicano art was influenced by post-Mexican Revolution ideologies, pre-Columbian art, European painting techniques and Mexican-American social, political and cultural issues. The movement worked to resist and challenge dominant social norms and stereotypes for cultural autonomy and self-determination. Some issues the movement focused on were awareness of collective history and culture, restoration of land grants, and equal opportunity for..Read More

1967
A black and white photo of Thich Nhat Hahn & Dr. Martin Luther King. They both look serious in front of microphones.

Solidarity in Service of Global “Beloved Community”; The Friendship of Thich Nhat Hahn & Dr. Martin Luther King

“ In January 1967, six months after they first met, Dr. King nominated Thầy for the Nobel Peace Prize, saying, “his ideas for peace, if applied, would build a monument to ecumenism, to world brotherhood, to humanity.”A few months later, on April 4th, 1967, Dr. King quoted Thầy’s book Lotus in a Sea of Fire in his landmark “Beyond Vietnam” speech at the Riverside Church in New York. It was the first time he unequivocally denounced the war and finally united the peace and civil rights movements. Dr. King shared Thầy’s powerful message that “Men are not our enemy. Our..Read More

1968
The East Los Angeles Walkouts or Chicano Blowouts, March 6, 1968

The East Los Angeles Walkouts or Chicano Blowouts, March 6, 1968

The East Los Angeles Walkouts or Chicano Blowouts were a series of 1968 protests by Chicano students against unequal conditions in Los Angeles Unified School District high schools. The first protest took place on March 6, 1968.

1968
The Chicano Moratorium

The Chicano Moratorium

The Chicano Moratorium, formally known as the National Chicano Moratorium Committee, was a movement of Chicano anti-war activists that built a broad-based coalition of Mexican-American groups to organize opposition to the Vietnam War. Led by activists from local colleges and members of the “Brown Berets”, a group with roots in the high school student movement that staged walkouts in 1968, the coalition peaked with an August 29, 1970 march in East Los Angeles that drew 30,000 demonstrators.

1968
May 1968

Student and Worker Uprising

May. 1968 in Paris, France. Students and Blue Collar Workers met on the streets. Together they dreamt and plan a change of power relationships in schools and factories. The young ones like me learnt how to listen. It also may have been my first understanding of the social power of visuals and prints. I was in my first year of Art schools, taking night classes. Our teachers had all been selected for life. The following year, 40 new teachers were hired. They were all under 40. We started to breeze.

1968
The American Indian Movement (AIM), founded July, 1968

The American Indian Movement (AIM), founded July, 1968

The American Indian Movement (AIM) is a Native American advocacy group in the United States, founded in July 1968 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. AIM was initially formed to address Native American affirmation, treaty issues, spirituality, and leadership while simultaneously addressing incidents of police harassment and racism against Natives forced to move away from reservations and tribal culture by the Indian Termination Policies. AIM’s paramount objective is to create “real economic independence for the Indians”.

1969
A black and white photograph showing four men sitting at a table in front of microphones, with three men standing behind them.

Rainbow Coalition

“ The First Rainbow Coalition begins in 1969, when the Chicago Black Panther Party, notably led by Fred Hampton, forms alliances across lines of race and ethnicity with other community-based movements in the city, including the Latino group the Young Lords Organization and the working-class young southern whites of the Young Patriots.” More info: https://www.zinnedproject.org/materials/the-first-rainbow-coalition/ https://southsideweekly.com/fifty-years-fred-hampton-rainbow-coalition-young-lords-black-panthers/

1969
The Occupation of Alcatraz, November 20, 1969 – June 11, 1971

The Occupation of Alcatraz, November 20, 1969 – June 11, 1971

The Occupation of Alcatraz was an occupation of Alcatraz Island by 89 American Indians and supporters, led by Richard Oakes, LaNada Means, and others. They chose the name Indians of All Tribes (IOAT)[1] and John Trudell was the spokesperson. According to the IOAT, under the Treaty of Fort Laramie (1868) between the U.S. and the Lakota, all retired, abandoned or out-of-use federal land was returned to the Native people who once occupied it. Since Alcatraz penitentiary had been closed on March 21, 1963, and the island had been declared surplus federal property in 1964, a number of Red Power activists..Read More

1974
Navajo-Hopi Struggle to Protect the Big Mountain Reservation, 1974

Navajo-Hopi Struggle to Protect the Big Mountain Reservation, 1974

Navajo-Hopi Struggle to Protect the Big Mountain Reservation In 1974, the federal government partitioned the Big Mountain reservation, where the Hopi and Navajo tribes currently reside, and transferred some of the land to private ownership. Many Hopi and Navajo were relocated to other lands, but some 300 families remain at Big Mountain to fight the continued exploitation of their lands by private mining companies. Currently, those 300 families are living on land that holds over $10 billion worth of coal. The Peabody Mining Company would like expand its operations by 13,800 acres, thus intruding upon the Big Mountain residents’ sovereignty..Read More

1976
Black History Month, 1976

Black History Month, 1976

The precursor to Black History Month was created in 1926 in the United States, when historian Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced the second week of February to be “Negro History Week”.[9] This week was chosen because it coincided with the birthday of Abraham Lincoln on February 12 and of Frederick Douglass on February 20, both of which dates black communities had celebrated together since the late 19th century. Black History Month was first proposed by black educators and the Black United Students at Kent State University in February 1969. The..Read More

1978
The album cover for "Siembra," by Willie Colon and Ruben Blades. It shows four babies in sitting in white space in the middle, surrounded by cartoon sky, trees, grass, and flowers.

Siembra

Siembra is the second studio album by Rubén Blades and Willie Colón, released by Fania Records in September 7, 1978. It is considered the best selling salsa album in the history of salsa My father asks me, why are you so political? But he forgets he introduced me to this music. This is an album I grew up listening to prior to coming to the United States. It is full of honesty and resistance. This album helped me understand the importance of making my music political.

1979
An image of Ted Koppel in a suit and tie on a TV screen, delivering a news report on Nightline. There is an inset image that says "Day 100" and "Iran."

Iranian Hostage Crisis

In 1979 dozens of American diplomats were taken hostage by militant Iranian students in the U.S. Embassy in Tehran soon after the Islamic revolution in Iran. They are held captive for 444 days and over this time the event receives the most extensive coverage on US television of almost any other event in U.S. history until then, including daily coverage on Nightline. This dramatically shapes the experiences of Middle Eastern people in the U.S. and especially Iranian Americans.

1990
The cover of the book "Dogeaters" by Jessica Hagedorn. It is a collage of drawings, featuring a face in the lower middle of the image, ambiguously expressionless and looking directly at the viewer.

Dogeaters by Jessica Hagedorn

Dogeaters, a novel by author Jessica Hagedorn, was published in March 1990. Winner of an American Book Award and nominated for the National Book Award, it became one of the best-known published creative works by a Filipina American. The title refers to a derogatory stereotype about Filipinos, and the novel centers on the lives of several characters from different social classes in Manila in the 1950s. The novel’s surrealist style underscores the maddening contradictions of life in a country where false appearances and abuse of power in politics, mass media, celebrity pop culture, religion, and family relationships overshadow reality and..Read More

1992
LA Riots April and May 1992

LA Riots April and May 1992

The 1992 Los Angeles riots were a series of uprisings that occurred in Los Angeles County in April and May of 1992

1994
The Zapatista Movement: The Fight for Indigenous Rights in Mexico

The Zapatista Movement: The Fight for Indigenous Rights in Mexico

The Zapatista Movement: The Fight for Indigenous Rights in Mexico On 1 January 1994, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation (EZLN), an indigenous armed organization, declared war on the Mexican Government, demanding “work, land, housing, food, health, education, independence, liberty, democracy, justice and peace.” The EZLN movement was an eye-opening event for both the Mexican government and the non-indigenous population to realize the alarming situation of indigenous people in Chiapas. The indigenous conflict in Chiapas not only provoked a domestic awareness of indigenous rights, recognition and self-determination, but also an international awakening on these issues.

1994
A man sits with his arm around a women, and there are two children sitting next to her. They are on long red seat in what looks like a Ferris wheel car. They look happy together.

“I Like it Like That”

“I Like It Like That” is a 1994 American comedy-drama film about the trials and tribulations of a young Puerto Rican man and a half Jamaican half Puerto Rican woman living in a poverty-stricken New York City neighborhood in the South Bronx. The film stars Lauren Velez, Jon Seda, Lisa Vidal, Griffin Dunne, Jesse Borrego and Rita Moreno, and was written and directed by Darnell Martin. This film was groundbreaking for a few reasons: 1) It was the first major motion picture to give an accurate, authentic and nuanced depiction of a Puerto Rican diasporic family trying to make it..Read More

1994
California Proposition 187, November 8, 1994

California Proposition 187, November 8, 1994

California Proposition 187 (also known as the Save Our State (SOS) initiative) was a 1994 ballot initiative to establish a state-run citizenship screening system and prohibit illegal immigrants from using non-emergency health care, public education, and other services in the State of California. Voters passed the proposed law at a referendum on November 8, 1994. The law was challenged in a legal suit and found unconstitutional by a federal district court. In 1999, Governor Gray Davis halted state appeals of this ruling.

1995
The Gustafsen Lake standoff, August-September 1995

The Gustafsen Lake standoff, August-September 1995

The Gustafsen Lake standoff was a confrontation between the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and the Ts’peten Defenders in the interior of British Columbia, Canada, at Gustafsen Lake (known as Ts’peten in the Shuswap language). The standoff began on August 18, 1995, and ended on September 17, 1995. The RCMP operation would end up being the most costly of its kind in Canadian history having involved 400 police officers and support from the Canadian Military (under Operation Wallaby). The predominantly indigenous occupiers believed that the “grazing rights privilege” ranch land on which they stood was both sacred space and part..Read More

1998
American Indian Diversity In Film. An official movie image, with the title "Smoke Signals" and three people with long dark hair, smiling in front of a desert landscape.

Smoke Signals (film)

“Smoke Signals” was marketed as the first feature film written, directed, and produced by Native Americans. It is an important movie for Indian Country and marked a big moment when Native people could see themselves reflected on the big screen. In 2018 it was added to the National Film Registry. The citation reads: “… After the early silent film pioneers James Young Deer and Edwin Carewe, the portrayal of Native Americans in cinema turned dark and stereotypical. These social trends started changing with motion pictures like the groundbreaking “Smoke Signals” … Beneath the highly entertaining façade, the film acquainted non-Native..Read More

1998
Michelle Kwan at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics

Michelle Kwan at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics

Michelle Kwan takes second at the 1998 Nagano Winter Olympics and all Asian Americans are mad about it, forever.

1998
Hurricane Hugo Hits SC September, 1989

Hurricane Hugo Hits SC September, 1989

Hurricane Hugo in Charleston, SC. It impacted the low wealth people who did not have insurance and small businesses. It impacted the poor Black Neighborhoods which were not protected against looting the same way as the other neighborhoods. Here on the picture a ILI fellow is going to check her tiny business downtown Charleston.

2011
Grace Lee Boggs Publishes ‘The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the 21st Century’

Grace Lee Boggs Publishes ‘The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the 21st Century’

Movement leader Grace Lee Boggs wrote The Next American Revolution: Sustainable Activism for the Twenty First Century with Scott Kurashige at the age of 95. In this powerful, deeply humanistic book, Grace Lee Boggs, a legendary figure in the struggle for justice in America, shrewdly assesses the current crisis—political, economical, and environmental—and shows how to create the radical social change we need to confront new realities. A vibrant, inspirational force, Boggs has participated in all of the twentieth century’s major social movements—for civil rights, women’s rights, workers’ rights, and more. She draws from seven decades of activist experience, and a..Read More

2017
A sign in Flushing shows a black-and-white photo of Yang Song, who has a slight smile in the photo. The sign has the name "Yang Song" and the text "Rest In Power" underneath. Below Yang Song's face, the sign says, "Yang Song was a 38-year-old Chinese immigrant and sex worker killed by the NYPD during a raid in Flushing last November. No NYPD officers have been disciplined or charged with any crime." The sign also says #DecrimNow #RightsNotRaids and #JusticeForYangSong

Death of Flushing Massage Worker Yang Song & Red Canary Song Organizing

38-year old Yang Song, a Flushing massage worker, fell four stories to her death during a New York Police Department raid on November 25, 2017. Song’s family revealed that she described being sexually assaulted by a man who flashed a badge and gun and claimed to be an undercover cop and that the police urged her to become a confidential informant and turn in clients and friends. She had been arrested months before on prostitution charges — her case referred to the Queens Human Trafficking Intervention Courts (HTICs) and a court date set. After her death, community organizers rallied outside..Read More

2019
An image of Kim Teehee speaking in front of a microphone.

Chief Hoskin announces the appointment of a Cherokee Nation delegate to Congress

Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. announced that the tribe is taking a historic initial step to enact the Cherokee Nation’s treaty right to send a delegate to the U.S. Congress. The Cherokee Nation delegate is referenced in both the Treaty of Hopewell from 1785 and the Treaty of New Echota from 1835 between the Cherokee Nation and the federal government. The Treaty of 1866 also reaffirms all previous treaties between the Cherokee Nation and the United States. For nearly two centuries, Congress has failed to honor this promise. Yet the obligation to seat a Cherokee Nation delegate remains..Read More

2020
An image of the base of architectural columns that might be in front of a courthouse. There is also the following text: "McGirt v. Oklahoma Supreme Court Decision Affirms Tribal Sovereignty, Upholds Treaty Rights." In the bottom corner of the image is the logo for the Arizona State University American Indian Policy Institute.

McGirt v. Oklahoma overturned

In 2020 the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction of child rapist Jimcy McGirt on the grounds that the Creek Nation’s reservation was never disestablished for criminal jurisdiction. State courts no longer have the authority to prosecute crimes committed by or against Oklahomans who are also tribal members. Hundreds of criminal cases are now being dismissed because the state does not have the ability to try and convict criminals on historic tribal lands.

2022
Everything Everywhere All At Once

Everything Everywhere All At Once

Michelle Yeoh stars as a Chinese American mother being audited by the Internal Revenue Services (IRS) for her failing laundry business, only to discover that she must connect with parallel universe versions of herself to prevent a powerful being from destroying the multiverse. It’s a genre-defying film that combines martial arts, science fiction, fantasy, animation, and comedy, and covers themes such as Asian American identity, queerness, intergenerational trauma, family, existentialism, and more. Ke Huey Quan (Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom) returns to acting from stunt coordinating and directing, after almost three decades of lack of acting opportunities, to..Read More

2022
A black and white picture of Kiyoshi Kuromiya in a button-down shirt, smiling at the camera.

Kiyoshi Kuromiya

Kiyoshi Kuromiya was a leading activist and organizer around the issues of justice for people living with HIV/AIDS, who lived in Philadelphia, PA for most of his life. His work, while focused, was intersectional and cross-issue, as he worked to make survival easier for people with HIV/AIDS. It wasn’t until the late 2010s, almost 20 years after his death, that he began to recieve more mainstream recognition for his work. Below is a message, from the ACT UP NY archives, from the time of his passing. Even this brief memorialization from his comrades misses many of his contributions to the..Read More

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